Category: Raw


Hey everyone,

On the 22nd of October, in Kensington Olympia, London Vegfest took place. I was lucky enough to have amazing friend Tomi telling me to contact the organiser regarding doing a cookery demo there. So I did, and there I was, many months later!

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Overall it was quite a nice day, all the more better to get to catch up with Tomi and see my colleagues and friends supporting me doing this kind of presentation for the first time. For some reason though the atmosphere was very much different, and strange I would even say, compared with the vegfests I have been to before. There was a lot more space than usual which was good, given that  you did not have to fight your way through the little corridors between stalls, but it also made it feel much more emptier. And despite there being many, many stalls, there still seemed to be nothing around. In the sense that there surely was all aspects of veganism represented in the form of food, drink, clothing, publications, charities, animal rights groups, alternative healthcare providers and more, yet when we were in search of food, all the stalls that would have been quite inviting had a queue worth 30 min of your time. Either the 7200 people that passed through the doors yesterday were too little for the amount of space that they this time had booked, or there were not enough stalls for it, but it just felt empty, and we ended up in a restaurant nearby for actual dinner, which is quite odd.
Luckily there is the Animal Aid Christmas fayre coming at the beginning of December, which I think will bring along quite a different atmosphere. Only time will tell!

I think everyone knows about my fascination and love with buckwheat by now, and that is what I wanted to showcase – the diversity of this pseudo cereal.
A little information about buckwheat – it is naturally gluten free, related to rhubarb, that is quite high in protein with 13.25 g in 100 g of dry produce, with 343 kcal of total energy. The  study that I wrote my undergrad thesis on also demonstrated buckwheat as the most satiating of the alternative plant based protein sources it compared (hemp, lupin, fava, green pea and buckwheat vs meat), which is why I always recommend it to people who claim that vegan foods make them full and empty again in very short periods of time; or for sportsmen who need more protein (or so they think). A great source.
There are also different types of buckwheat – raw, sprouted, and roasted. I grew up consuming the latter one, as porridge – we would call it – which essentially meant instead of rice in the context. It is boiled similarly to rice, and it does expand a lot once boiled. As a kid I would always eat it with ketchup. Letcho made a good sauce also. As I grew older I had it with cheese mixed in so it would melt – it works magic with melting vegan cheeses too! My brother would mix the two I think, but I always had a problem with mixing dairy with ketchup. And that has carried over to veganism as well, I find it mentally challenging to eat ketchup with vegan cheese.
Anyway, after being vegan for a year or more, I had quite a look into the raw food world and started using sprouted buckwheat for breakfast – mix it with dried fruit and seeds/nuts for muesli for example, or blend soaked raw buckwheat with flavouring such as cinnamon, and spread it out to dehydrate instead of cereal. However when I tried cooking raw buckwheat into porridge I was put off for quite a while trying to do any kind of porridge from raw buckwheat. For so long in fact that I was eagerly waiting for Rawligion to open given that they were supposed to serve raw buckwheat porridge and I wanted to see proof that it can be done tasting good. Well, Rawligion did open but there was no buckwheat porridge. So one day I decided to pick up the matter again and looked up 10 different recipes and thought I realised what I needed to do. And so I tried. And it came out amazing.  🙂
And the different states of buckwheat is something I also wanted to demonstrate, which I am quite happy worked out even without realising! I came up with three different recipes that I showcased at vegfest, and here they are also for everyone’s convenience.

Buckwheat krispie cakes

Makes six about 60 g bars (with about 14 g protein per bar), or many many smaller pieces

Base:

1 cup (160 g) activated buckwheat (soaked for 2-4 hours, dehydrated)
1/3 cup (70 g) almond butter
1/4 cup (50 g) manna (coconut butter)
1 heaped tbsp (20 g) maple syrup/coconut nectar/other sweetener
pinch salt

Chocolate:

1/4 cup (50 g) manna
1 tsp (5 g) cacao powder
1 tbsp (10 g) xylitol, pulverised, or any other sweetener you fancy
1 tbsp (15 g) coconut oil

Method:

Melt the manna in hot water bath. Mix all the base ingredients together and press into a container about 10 x 20 cm size, dependent on how thick you like it choose larger/smaller surface area.
Mix together the chocolate ingredients, melt again in hot water bath if needed to get it more liquid, and pour over the base. If you like, add cacao nibs, coconut, or whatever else you fancy for decoration on top now so it would set together with the chocolate.
Refrigerate for about 30 minutes until it sets. Cut into pieces and enjoy!

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Raw buckwheat porridge

Makes two about 150 g servings (plenty for breakfast!)

100 g raw buckwheat groats
1 g (pinch) cinnamon
100 ml almond milk (or any other plant milk)
60 g dates (more if you want it sweeter)
50 g berries + more for topping if you like

Method:

Soak the buckwheat in water for 2-4 hours (can be overnight if you prefer), rinse well until the water runs clear
Add all the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. If you want it thicker, feel free to add some chia seeds to it and blend again, or reduce the amount of milk.
I have done this with blueberries, bilberries and strawberries, and it has worked magic with all of them. I have no reason to think it would not work with raspberries, grapes, or even kiwis, but only experience will tell.
I quite like layering food and having a layer of desiccated coconut for example adds some texture and visuals when serving from a glass. A strip of cinnamon could also do, or more berries is also very nice. Voila!

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Buckwheat risotto

Serves two with a side, or one very hungry

100 g kasha (roasted buckwheat)
300 g water (more/less depends if cooked with or without a lid)
1 stock cube
1 small swede
1 carrot
1 small / 1/2 large courgette
small handful of fresh parsley
125 ml oat cream (or any alternative)
Pinch of onion, garlic powder
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp sea salt
black pepper to taste

Method:

Boil the kasha for 10-15 min with the stock cube, until soft, drain excess water.
Grate the vegetables, chop the parsley, and mix in the kasha together with the cream and all the spices/herbs.
You can either cook it for a few more minutes or let the heat of the kasha soften and heat up the rest of the ingredients.
Taste and add as much of salt/pepper to make it appealing to your palate. I added a decent 1/3 tsp I think of freshly ground black pepper to the portion I made, but always taste and season to taste.
Serve with a side salad, veggie sausages or anything else you desire. Decorate with fresh parsley or microherbs.

Hope you will enjoy these as much as I did and do. Will all be available at Rawligion very soon! Stay tuned!

More photos and videos on my presentation coming soon thanks to the ever amazing Tomi 🙂

Eli x

Raw chia pudding

Hello everyone,

I am on a roll and here is another of my recipes.

I have much got into chia seeds now, given that we do amazing ones at work and I have not had it too much yet. Being at home and bringing with me a pack a chia seeds I would never find time to use up whilst in London, now was my chance to spread the love of chia seeds given that I actually had to prepare myself breakfast. I do like chia puddings 🙂

Ingredients:

100 g blueberries
250 g raw plant milk (I made fresh hemp milk, 100 g hemp seeds with 1 l of water, blended, strained through muslin cloth or nut milk bag)
50 g dates
1 banana
pinch of salt

50 g chia seeds

Blend all ingredients together except the chia seeds. Once smooth, mix in the seeds by hand. Let is stand for some 15 minutes to see whether the consistency is what you want. Change by adding milk or chia seeds. Leave it for at least 30 min further so the seeds could rehydrate, best left for 2 hours to overnight. So easy to do in the evening and then serve in the morning.

For decoration use anything you fancy, I did desiccated coconut, more blueberries, goji berries, agave syrup/honey from your ethically producing relative. Yum!

Enjoy!

Eli x

Raw buckwheat porridge

Hello dearest all,

Significant amount of time has passed once more as my life took my skills and area of expertise to a new plant based start-up called Rawligion. Never before have I worked so many hours, but neither can I recall a time I have been so happy to go to work in the (very early) morning. Anyway, this was to say I have been utterly busy and only now finding time to share another delicious recipe with yous.

Ever since I was a kid, buckwheat has been a big part of my diet. That is only in the form of kasha though, the toasted buckwheat groats. We used to do porridge with that, and by porridge I mean very similar to rice – boil with about double the amount of water until soft and fluffy; then free hands to use in risottos, salads, or as appropriate for a kid – eat with ketchup and veggies on the side. It is also great with vegan cheese layered in between freshly cooked buckwheat, then left to stand for 5 minutes so the cheese melts perfectly. Anyway, I love buckwheat.

My affection to buckwheat was strengthened with my thesis, when we compared buckwheat with a number of other high protein plant foods to meat regarding their satiating properties. As buckwheat came out as a winner in the acute study I had the most data for when writing the thesis, I began to advocate it even more when people were telling me that they find it difficult to feel full or to feel full for as long on plant based diet compared with one including meat.

Raw buckwheat came to my horizon a few years ago as I was experimenting with a fully raw diet, when I used the raw groats in patties, rehydrated and then dehydrated them to have as part of my morning cereal bowl, or even did these raw ‘cornflakes’, if you must, again for breakfast purposes. However, the porridge aspect has enthralled me for a while but I had not the courage to experiment with it, given that at that time, I tried a very simple version and it tasted horrible. I think I may also have tried cooking raw buckwheat and that was the worst mistake ever.

But lots of time has passed and here I am, spreading the recipe of how to do amazing raw buckwheat porridge for breakfast with my mum, with my siblings, and to be added to the menu at work for winter. I had been scanning a few different recipes, especially given as I had promised to include that in my cookery demo at the next London Vegfest in October, and was utterly happy when my first trial turned out so well that it was deemed good enough for work.

So here goes a recipe I have been spreading with my folks:

100 g raw buckwheat groats – soak for about 2 hours until the starch is all released and it is easy to mash between fingers
15 g chia seeds
100 g plant based milk (I have used almond, or hemp milk, good with any!)
60 g dates (I subbed with 4 tsp honey I get from my uncle – guaranteed ethically produced!, as I had no dates at home, or agave would do as well potentially)
40 g blueberries (in frozen form my mum had in abundance in the freezer, may have used more; can also sub for other berries)
1 tsp cinnamon (optional)

Once the buckwheat is soft and starch released, berries defrosted if using frozen ones, put all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth, chia seeds broken apart and the texture thick but somewhat runny. You can adjust it with more milk, or more dates if you want it thicker or runnier.

For presentation I like layers. I would add in a glass 2 tbsp of porridge, 2 tbsp desiccated coconut, 2 tbsp porridge, 2 tbsp ground almonds (or more coconut to keep nut free), 2 tbsp porridge, 2 tbsp more berries, 2 tbsp porridge, and garnish on top with more berries, coconut, goji berries, whatever you feel like. I also made blueberry jam by blending blueberries with a bit of chia and dates for an extra layer of different textures.

Hope you enjoy as much as I have and will!

Eli x

 

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First of all – all credit to the name goes to Samuel Lee, my comi at bhuti.

It has again been a massively long and tiring week, and once cancelled pop up dinner was rescheduled for the last day of June, Thursday the 30th. My initial plans to go with a specific cuisine did not happen as I decided to go with something simple for me to prep, but good, and thus thought that as raw lasagna had been a winner at my last pop up dinner, people should have the chance to also try the raw pizza. As I had another event to do canapes for the same evening, it was non-stop indeed until it was 7.30pm – the estimated time for commencing the dinner service.

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There were very few people present, but most had booked days in advance, and only an addition of two came on the day making my life easier. Also everyone was able to have a chat with all the people present. Welcoming nibbles included battered vegetables, raw courgette hummus, and a beetroot-carrot-orange-lemon-ginger juice.

The first course was courgette rolls, two kinds, both filled with pesto, one with a cherry tomato, the other with carrot, pepper and sprouts. Pesto really works so well with courgette, it is a match made in heaven. And a little canape of candy and purple beetroot layered with cranberry cheese sauce and topped with sprouts. And SUMAC! I love sumac.

The second course was the raw pizza. I made a tomato-oregano raw base with base ingredients such as carrots, red onion, sunflower seeds and flax. The toppings included hand-pitted olives, sweetcorn, red peppers, walnut mince (tamari, agave, smoked paprika flavoured), crispy aubergine (marinated in tamari, EVO, lemon juice, paprika, cumin, chilli -> dehydrated), layered on top of sundried tomato marinara sauce, and topped with basic cashew cheese sauce and some oregano and sprouts. This is way more filling than one might perceive from its looks.

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Third course was a selection of desserts. I did a coconut-carob-chocolate tarts, essentially coconut butter with some coconut milk (from the canned coconut) and some coconut sugar for the base, a slice of banana, and topped with carob chocolate – coconut oil, maple syrup, and carob powder. I got this pack of carob at work which was of such a superior quality I digged the flavour so much I could not stop myself from making the carob chocolate. And also carob truffles. They are also the ‘bhuti balls’ at the time, truffles the tea room sells at all times with changing the recipe with each batch, this time containing sunflower seeds, coconut, cashews, carob, hemp seeds, hemp protein, and dates. I think this is the exhaustive list of ingredients… And the last pieces were fruit roll-ups. The rolls were something in between fruit leather and raw wraps, basically a fruit smoothie with very little of flax blended in, as it looked too liquidy for my liking, and then dehydrated. For the filling I did coconut cream (tinned coconut milk with agave and vanilla) and sliced strawberries. After it had stayed in the fridge for an hour, the ‘leather’ soaked in some of the moisture and yum with the intertwined and infused flavours! And then topped it with a chocolate swirl and edible flowers.

Fourth course, and may I add – respect for the guests to have made it so far – was cultured cream cheese – basic cashew cheese recipe with added probiotics, left to culture for a day in a warm place. I separated the yield in half and chopped a heck of a lot of chives and parsley in one. It was served with raw bread, which was a mixture of carrots, courgette, spinach, onion, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and flax, and herbs/spices. All this accompanied by a handful of grapes and pineapple.

Similar to last time, I decided to serve a hot drink to top it off, this time our Golden Elixir from the menu, which is essentially a spiced turmeric drink including cinnamon, black pepper, nutmeg and cardamom. Together with that I had a spur-of-the-moment idea and did some chocolate covered strawberries to put the cherry on top of the evening.

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From the feedback received, everyone seemed to enjoy all parts of the dinner, and it quite likely beat the option of fish and chips. I think the only part I still need to master is the amounts, for four courses, be as small as the nibbles are, is still rather filling. Me and Andrea, the newest chef addition at bhuti helping me out that evening, had a pizza for our dinner, and only that filled us up to the brim. Thank god for take-away options!

All in all, my ride at bhuti has been an educative one. I do not think I would have had the chance to start as a head chef so soon had it not been for a new startup such as this. And thanks to the steep learning curve I now can value my time and area of expertise much more, and am content with moving on from there to new challenges, and new chance to help up another start-up, this time just around the corner from where I am currently based. I would not have survived as long as I did without my dearest kitchen crew, and all the other colleagues who have lent me a shoulder to cry on and reasons to laugh until my eyes water.

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Kitchen’s angels. My kitchen team of Andrea, Sam, myself, and Junko there in our minds.

Thank you bhuti for offering me all the chances I had to improve myself and the business; and welcome to Rawligion, my new head chef challenge in the raw vegan world.

PS, last chance to catch me at bhuti next week Mon-Fri! After that you will find me on 3 Tottenham Street!

Gracefully yours,

Eli xx

Raw red velvet cake

Heya folk,

Here is my take on the American classic Red Velvet cake. I found myself in a situation with too many beetroots around that needed using up, and luckily enough of other ingredients to make it work as a cake! The process is quite simple, but the cake is utterly delish. It is as moist as the cooked version, but way healthier! Also kept it nut free, but feel free to add some if you want it heavier. 🙂

Ingredients:

Base:

3-4 medium beetroots
1 1/2 cups desiccated coconut
1 cup sunflower seeds
1/3 cup flaxmeal
1/3 cup buckwheat flour (raw buckwheat soaked, dehydrated, milled)
1 tbsp vanilla extract
1 cup dates

Cream:

2 full fat tins of coconut milk
1 tsp vanilla
1-2 tbsp agave/maple

OR

1 cup coconut butter (process desiccated coconut until it gets smooth)
1/2 cup plant milk (any of your choice, do yourself by soaking about 1 cup of nuts/seeds per 1 litre of milk, juice or process with water and separate pulp)
2 tbsp agave

Process:

For the base, put all the ingredients in the food processor (with the S-blade) and process until smooth. Add dates if you want to make it sweeter, or extra seeds/coconut to make it drier.  It will get quite fine and velvety if you do it for long enough. Press half of it into the cake tin.

For the cream, if you are using coconut milk cans, scoop out the white part only and mix with vanilla and sweetener with a whisk until smooth. Add more or less sweetener according to your taste.
For the other white chocolate-y layer melt the coconut butter (or have it freshly made so it is still soft), dilute it down with some liquid and sweeten it if you feel like it.

Do a layer of the cream (leave in the freezer for a short while if you need to for the hardening), and press on a second layer of the base. Cover it once more with the cream, or do a pattern instead by piping.

For decorations you can add fresh fruit, berries, or chocolate – as you wish!
It is a very simple process, really, and very vibrant with the colors! Here are the two versions I made:

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Hope you like it!

Eli x

Raw apple pie

Hello everyone!

The spring is in the air and even more the reason to get ‘cookin’ on the raw cakes! This one is a very simple recipe, full of raw apple goodness and date sweetness. Ready in about half an hour if you got a mandolin, food processor, and a blender handy. 🙂

Ingredients:

1/2 cup cashews
1 cup coconut
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup dates

~ 10 apples
2 cups of dates
2 bananas/3 apples
1 tbsp vanilla
1 lemon (juice)
1 tbsp cinnamon
(chocolate)
(dried apple pieces)

Method:

For the base, chuck the cashews, coconut, sunflower seeds and dates in a food processor and process until chunky but sticky. If it does not seem to get sticky enough, add a piece of apple and that should help with the binding.
Press to the base of a cake tin (I use one that is 8-9″ in diameter I think).

Mandolin the apples quite thinly (as thin as you can without making the slices break) and put them in water with 1/2 lemon squeezed in it (helps with maintaining the colour). Meanwhile do the caramel.
Blend the dates with vanilla, rest of the lemon juice, cinnamon and bananas/apples and any extra apple pieces you may have left over, for example the broken pieces or slices that were too thick or thin for using. It should come out like a proper sweet caramel. Tweak the flavour if you want with some nutmeg and ginger.

Cover the base with some of the caramel and arrange the apple slices to cover it all. Cover them with more caramel and repeat that until you run out of the caramel (which should be the topmost layer).

Dust some more cinnamon over it, or melt some 30g of chocolate in hot water bath and put it in a piping bag to do funky chocolate works on top. I was doing another cake at the same time and thus had chocolate handy, but did a very plain topping.
It is way easier to cut into it once it has set for a few hours in the fridge. Otherwise it may become a very messy task and the layers will slide easily. Still delish though!

Now this cake is quite sweet as you can tell from the amount of dates, so if you are not such a fan, just use less of the dates. The caramel will still be fine, and the base as well, just add more fruit to bind it. I would serve it with some dehydrated apple slices, but some coconut cream would be nice as well, to balance the sweetness somewhat. A drizzle of agave adds nice reflective features, and more cinnamon and fanned fruit makes it look fancy. 🙂

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Yum! Enjoy!

Eli x

 

Hello everyone,

It has been a while since I have had time to post a new recipe here. So here goes! A pretty simple but delicious recipe for your delight. It may seem to be long and complicated, but it really is easy to do despite the many layers!

Ingredients:

Base:

1 1/2 cup desiccated coconut
1/2 cup cashews (or any other nuts, or more coconut)
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup soft dates

Coconut cream:

4 tins of full-fat coconut milk
1-2 tsp vanilla
2-3 tbsp agave/maple (or any other sweetener)

Blueberry jam:

150g blueberries
2-3 tbsp chia seeds
1 tbsp agave

Fillings:

1 mango (or any other soft fruit, like banana, or kiwi)
50-100g blueberries

Process:

This is fairly simple. Add the dry base ingredients to the food processor and let it work until it is quite floury consistency. Then add the vanilla and dates until it all sticks together. Alternatively, if you do not have a food processor, blend dry stuff to flour, blend dates and vanilla with little water to a thick puree and mix them together in a bowl. Or mince dates in a mincer and mix together again. Press flat to the cake tin. Line with baking parchment prior to that, to make it easier to get the cake out afterwards.

For the jam, blend the blueberries with a little agave to a puree and mix in the chia seeds. They will start to set already in 10 minutes, so keep an eye on them to see about the consistency, whether they need more seeds or water.

Scoop out the thick white part of the coconut milk tins into a separate bowl. Try to get as little of the water as you can. Add the vanilla and sweetener and whip it all together. It should be really creamy and remind much of whipped cream. Add vanilla/sweetener to taste if needs adjustment. Do not under any circumstances use a blender for the mixing – the coconut will then separate and trust me, it is not easy to try and save it by turning it into a completely different dish.

Slice the mango to about 2-3mm thick slices. Arrange them on top of the base to cover the layer more or less. Add a layer of the coconut cream to fill in all the gaps and have a bit on top of the mango. Add another layer of the mango and top with nearly all the coconut cream. It should add a decent centimeter at least if not more. Leave a few scoops for decoration on top.

The jam should be of a relatively thick consistency by now and you should be able to spread it evenly on top of the coconut cream.

And all that is left to do is decorate! Put the rest of the coconut cream in a piping bag and set about doing whatever shapes you fancy! I made this cake as a birthday cake, so wrote the name in the middle and did the circle around, which I then also topped with more blueberries. But let your creativity fly and have fun. Here is the cake I made:

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It was quite well received an definitely up on my list of favourites.

Enjoy! More to come soon

Eli x

Juicing! With parsnip!

I love juicing. At the moment I have been juicing on average once a day for more than a week and it is great! My motivator is having my vegan sister living next-door to me who is into that, and the desire to reduce my intake of solids. Also it feels great going to the supermarket only to get fresh produce.

I have been keeping it quite safe though, not using any tomatoes, half veg-half fruit kinda combos. Keeping it simple as well – carrot-apple(-beetroot), courgette-pear/apple, added ginger/lemon here and there, fairly simple stuff. We have been wondering regarding what more veg/fruit we can use for juicing, so we did some pure plum juice, or plum and beetroot. I was sceptical regarding plums at first, because any juice I have seen in stores is usually never fresh but from concentrate, and includes plum pulp, not exactly juice. But it juices really well! Thus plum – being currently in season as well – is included in every second juice just now.
We also juiced a little bit of some kale, but the yield was not significant really, thus it requires a lot for very little – better leave it for eating as a whole. I used up a couple of cucumbers, but as my sis is not able to digest them alongside some other foods, like peppers, we have had to find alternatives. And that is when the thought came – parsnip! We had no clue how it would juice, or what it would taste like. Yesterday morning the time had come to use them up before they go off, or roast them for alternative if it turned out awful.

We had a whole pack of parsnips, which would be around 1 kilo I imagine. We started off with apples and pears, and added the first parsnip – halfway through only to come to the realisation it might taste revolting and quickly changed the jug to a glass to separate the juice. Finished with the first one we had a try – and it was amazing! Like more amazing than carrots! It comes a little bit powdery (but that was amplified with the pears), but otherwise so smooth and sweet. In a way that it would not be a problem to have a glass of pure parsnip juice, the way you can with carrot also! But they are even sweeter than carrots. Ah, it was truly wonderful. So we continued to do the whole pack and after having given it a good stir – got a creamy ivory-coloured drink which reminded us of milkshake (and might be put to use similarly).

Here’s to another great juicing discovery!

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Eli x

Hiya, all,

As a way of celebrating pancake Tuesday yesterday, I made some awesome pancakes with ingredients from the top of my head, and they were great – thick, without fat and with very little wheat. And then I got a lovely question from Twitter for a recipe, which reminded me of a time 2 years ago when I also made raw pancakes and decided to make a pancake recipe post. I will share rough 3 different recipes.

1. Oat pancakes
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1.5 cups oat flour (ground oat flakes)
0.5 cup wholegrain flour (can be substituted with gluten-free flour, or rice flour, or gram flour)
50-100 g muscovado/molasses
1 tbsp baking powder
1 tbsp cinnamon
2 tbsp flaxmeal
1 tsp ground ginger
1 banana (mashed)
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp lemon juice
1 cup soy milk (or other alternative)
water

Just mix all the dry ingredients and add the wet ingredients. Add water/milk enough to make it into a yoghurt-like consistency. This amount made me about 30 palm-size pancakes – which was a lot. But they got ready rather quickly, one batch in 2 minutes tops 🙂 They need no oil when frying if you have a decent enough pan where they wouldn’t get stuck.
Serve immediately or they’re good cold as well (my lunch today). Great with jam, ice-cream, marmalade, chocolate spread or whatever you can think of.

2. Regular pancakes

2 cups wholegrain flour
0.5 cup dark sugar/sweetener
1 tbsp baking powder
1 tbsp cinnamon
1 tbsp lemon juice
(0.25 cup vegetable oil)
1 cup soy milk (or alternative)
water
Optional:
banana
berry flour
flaxmeal
cocoa/carob powder
chocolate chips
lucuma/maca/spirulina/wheatgrass
apple sauce

As always, mix the dry ingredients and add the wet, dough should have yoghurt-like consistency again. Serve with whatever you like!

3. Raw pancakes
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2 bananas (mashed)
0.25 cup ground brazilnuts/almonds/buckwheat flour
1 tbsp cinnamon
~3 tbsp flaxmeal
Optional:
chia seeds
berry flour
spices like ginger, cloves, or cocoa, lucuma etc (as above)

Add the dry ingredients to the banana-mash, add more of the dry ingredients if after 10 minutes of leaving it stand it’s more liquid than yoghurt-like. It should stay about 5-7mm thickness when putting onto the paraflex sheet in your dehydrator. Dehydrate for 4-5 hours on one side and then turn around/remove the paraflex sheet if possible. Dehydrate another 2-3 hours or until the level of dryness desired. Serve with raw jam (fruit+dates blended/fruit+chia seed) or whatever you desire. 🙂

 

I hope this has been an informative post and you will get to enjoy amazing pancakes!

Eli x

Howdy-ho folk,

This time I thought, inspired by a very delicious weekend, I’d share this incredibly easy idea of making your own veggie burgers.

When I think of veggie burgers, I think mostly of bean-burgers, but they can be made literally with just vegetables. The later takes more preparation time and effort, but the taste is absolutely amazing. So, I’m gonna share three basic recipes/ideas of what I’ve done here.

1. Bean burgers

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In essence the easiest.

You’ll need:

1 can of cooked beans of your own choice (kidney, chickpeas, mixed can, etc)
Herbs/spices
Some veggies (optional) – carrot, onion, celery
Wholegrain flour/wheatgerm/breadcrumbs/buckwheat flour – something dry to bind it all

On the second and third photo we used:
2 cans of chickpeas
1 can of mixed beans in chilli sauce
1 bunch of each – coriander, parsley, chives
~100g wheatgerm
pinch of salt

Process the beans with the herbs/spices, mix in the dry binder – wheatgerm in this case. The batter turned out rather soft, but still possible to form patties with hands and then baked in the oven – turned around after 10-15 minutes, so the water evaporates to an extent and afterwards it stuck together quite well to have it in between the whole burger – bun, tomato, cucumber, gherkin, lettuce, vegan cheese and ketchup. Or, just have it as it is with some nice sauce like hummus or sweet&sour sauce or ketchup or cashew cheese sauce, like I had with the burgers on the first photo.
YUM! If I may say 🙂

2. Seitan burgers

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These are fairly easy to make, it’s just a wee bit of a game to make the seitan. But it’s enjoyable if you like to get your hands dirty.

You’ll need – white flour, salt, and any spices you’d like, I’d strongly suggest soy sauce amongst else.

To make seitan, mix about 3 cups of flour with a pinch of salt. Now comes the wee bit tricky part. You have to mix in just enough water to get it all bound, and not have it sticking to your hands, total should be around 1 cup of water, nae more. It should be pretty thick ball by the end of it. Then cover it with cling film and leave in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.
And now comes the fun part. Once it’s nice and set, you have to start washing it. Now you will need to use cold water so I suggest putting a pair of gloves on to protect your hands from mild hypothermia.
Take the seitan ball, a bigger bowl, put it in there and fill the bowl with cold water. I prefer to do it in the sink so I don’t have to be careful for spillages. And what you do is just play with it. Squeeze it, rip it, what you’re trying to do, it wash away most of it, so there’s only the gluten there left pretty much. Replace the water once it’s pretty full of the flour and not very transparent any more. I change it usually 3 times, and by the end of it, the seitan has reduced significantly. Then I have the tap running slowly and I try to get the last bits and blobs out, until the water runs clean. Now try and drain it as thoroughly as you can, use all the muscles you have in your arms and get it as dry as possible. Then, it’s is ready! Well, in this stage. What it should look like is something like this – except the colour

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On the photo I tried to put spices in the seitan in stage 1 and it pretty much ended up just colouring it without having any flavour, so I don’t suggest wasting spices then, keep them for later.
Now that you have this wee ball of gluten (pretty much), it’s time to put the kettle on and boil some water. To restore some of the lost volume of the seitan, it’s best to boil it. But first you have to decide what shapes you want it to be in. I often make it into a sausage shape and then slice it, so that the pieces would look like burgers in the end. Do take into account that the size will just about double when you boil it.
So, cut up the shapes you want and drop them one by one in boiling water. You can mix them if you want, to make sure they’re not stuck to each other or the bottom of the pot, but if you dropped them in separately, it shouldn’t be much to worry about. They are ready when they rise to the top of the water. Take them out and try to drain any excessive water still on them. Now finally comes the part when you get to spice things up.
You can fry them, bake them or do whatever you want with them now. I have usually fried them in some oil, and put plenty of spices on top – pepper, cumin, chilli, garlic, paprika, but to top it all, when it’s nice and crispy from both sides – add some soy sauce. Now steam will rise and the pan will not appreciate it much, but it sure gives a good colour to the seitan and SUCH a nice flavour. The texture is quite chicken-like if I ever remembered one correctly. And it works brilliantly in a ‘hamburger’. 🙂

3. Veggie burgers

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I love these burgers, but I rarely make them as it just takes a bit too long. A food processor is a VERY valuable tool here.

You’ll need:
Plenty of veggies of your own choice – potato, sweet potato, carrot, courgette, onion, parsnip, celery, leek
RAISINS! I love them, but if you don’t, just skip it.
Flour – wholegrain, I used to use pea flour, but I haven’t been able to find it for over 4 years, so anything pretty much would work. As well as wheatgerm.
Breadcrumbs
Spices
Oil for frying

So, what to do, is grate all the veggies (chop the onion/leek), add the raisins, flour and spices. For spices I’ve used curry, chilli, dill, thyme, basil, garlic, cumin, paprika, and soy sauce. But not too much of the latter. Mix it all together and add enough flour to make sure it all sticks together decently well.
It’s nice to cover it in breadcrumbs after that, but it’s not an obligatory step.
Next, you’ll start frying it. I think actually baking it would work either, but I’ve never done it myself. Fry it well from both sides until nice and golden, it takes at least 5 minutes I think. At the end, I again like to add soy sauce, turn them around once more in it, to add the colour and amazing burst of the flavour when you first bite into it. So as you see, it’s not a particularly difficult to do, but the frying and making them into patties takes quite a while. But, it’s worth it!

Usually I’d have it as a side for any other main meal, or just serve it with dips/sauces, I actually haven’t made it into a full burger as such, but I think it would be grand like that also. 🙂

So, that’s my overview of veggie burgers. Hope I’ve given you some ideas for a quick but amazing meal. Bon appetit!

Eli x